North Sea Coast

The images in this post are from the Salt & Surf Collection 

I grew up with a view of the sea and within a 3 mile walk to the nearest long stretch of beach, where we would run around in the dunes, surf and swim in the mostly icy cold, saltiness of the North Sea, ecstatic when the waves became just that little bit dangerous.

 

 

I no longer live on the coast, I traded this for a life on the inland waterways, but I think the sea is within me still. I miss the smell of ozone and seaweed at low tide: the sounds of crashing waves, the Headland fog horn, the surf hissing its retreat and the lone cries of sea birds. We would spend all day and evenings on the beach or in the dunes having small beach parties, burning driftwood and 'winkle picking; wrapping ourselves in hippy blankets and watching the sunset. From my bedroom window I would look through my telescope at the large container ships making their way into and out of the port.

 

 

When I get the chance to have time to myself, it is the sea I head for. There is no other place you can feel this particular type of solitude - not loneliness, more of a heightened sense of being alone at the edge of the land. 

 

 

I love to pick through the tide line for washed up treasure, and clamber around the rock pools, lifting rocks to watch the small creatures skitter away. Inevitably, I will leave with a pocket full of sandy sea shells and feathers. 

 

 

As a photographer, I want to represent my relationship with and memories of the coast. To do this I use different creative techniques to add atmosphere and a sense of the ethereal. This can be adding textures and playing with colour, either to heighten drama and peril, or create a sense of calm and lightness. I also try to incorporate wildlife, maritime heritage - the human lives built and lost around the sea.

 

 

 

 

 

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